Bobby Short: Bobby Short at the Cafe Carlyle (Live)

Catalog # 71515

UPC # 602267151527

 

Bobby Short, vocals and piano;

Beverly Peer, Bass; Gene Gammage, drums

 

 

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“Bobby Short shows why he’s at the summit of cabaret singing.”– Variety Magazine

Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle is a live album that showcases the iconic artist at his best. Singer and pianist Bobby Short, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs an 18-song set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle. This timeless Album, Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, features Bobby Short, as well as Beverly Peer on Bass and Gene Gammage behind the drums.

Called “the nations most celebrated cabaret performer” and self-described as a saloon singer, Bobby Short is a veteran of the high-class lounges of New York, Paris, and London.  In this remarkable DVD, entitled Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, the renowned singer and pianist, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs a thrilling set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle.

“He is a superb stylist, a sophisticated performer who blends savoir faire and genuine talent in equal measure.”    The Boston Globe

As we enjoy the impeccable savoir faire of Bobby Short & the Café Carlyle, the film also takes us into his home, for an exclusive, intimate look at the man behind the music. No Cover, No Minimum, just You, Bobby Short and the intimacy of the New York Cabaret.

New York nightlife, the elegant Cafe Carlyle, Paris, London, Cole Porter, Gershwin, Sondheim… This is the world of singer 7 pianist Bobby Short, the reigning monarch of the nightclubs of Cafe Society. Performing from his catalog of classic songs, the legendary Bobby Short and his dynamic voice played packed performances at the world-renowned Cafe Carlyle for nearly 50 years.

Song Selection:

  1. Medley: Honeysuckle Rose / When My Sugar Walks Down the Street / You’re the Cutest One
  2. I Love You (Samantha)
  3. Four Walls and One Dirty Window Blues
  4. Too Marvelous for Words
  5. Bojangles of Harlem
  6. Medley: Streamline Lulubelle / Posin’ / Everybody’s Truckin’ / Breakfast in Harlem / Old Man Harlem / Thanks to Harlem Now
  7. Why Shouldn’t I
  8. The Best is Yet to Come
  9. My Personal Property
  10. How’s Your Romance?
  11. I’m Satisfied
  12. Do As The Romans Do
  13. On the Amazon
  14. Dancing At That Moving Picture Ball
  15. Say It Isn’t So
  16. Losing My Mind
  17. Pilot Me (Pilote-Moi)
  18. (I’ll See You In) Cuba

 

About Bobby Short

African American recording artist and three-time Grammy nominee Bobby Short (1924-2005), a self-taught piano prodigy during his childhood, was regarded as the quintessential sophisticated cabaret and supper-club vocalist and piano player of his time.  Short performed intimate renditions of American song standards over seven decades, and for 36 of those years, from 1968 through 2004, Short and his jazz combo had a long-term contract at the exclusive Café Carlyle in New York.

Short was born in Danville, Illinois. He learned to play piano by ear at the age of four. By the time he was nine Short was already performing at private parties and in local roadhouses and saloons. After graduating from Danville High School in 1942 Short launched his adult career at 18, performing at the Capitol Lounge in Chicago. In 1943 he played on the same bill in Omaha, Nebraska with Nat “King” Cole, and got engagements all over the US. During a gig at the Blue Angel in New York City in 1945 Short met legendary cabaret singer Mabel Mercer, with whom he became good friends. From 1948 through 1951 Short performed at Café Gala in Los Angeles, a nightclub frequented by Lena Horne, Margaret Whiting, and Cole Porter. Miles Davis claimed that his own “cool jazz” style was influenced by Short.

In 1952 Short moved to Paris, France, playing in nightclubs there and in London, England. In Europe Short met Ahmet Ertegun, the founder of Atlantic Records, who signed Short to a contract in 1954.  By 1955 Short was back in the United States where his debut album for Atlantic Records, Songs by Bobby Short, was recorded.  Short played at clubs throughout the United States and Europe, performed on Broadway in several musical plays, recorded more albums, performed for four presidents, wrote two autobiographies, and during his legendary years at the Café Carlyle he also appeared on television programs, including the miniseries Roots: The Next Generations. He played himself in the 1986 Woody Allen movie, Hannah and Her Sisters. The Library of Congress bestowed a “Living Legend” award on Short in 2000.

About the Songs

Honeysuckle Rose – Medley

In this special recording Bobby Short creates a playful medley of famous Broadway Classics. “Honeysuckle Rose” is a 1929 song composed by Fats Waller with lyrics by Andy Razaf. It was introduced in the 1929 Off-Broadway revue “Load of Coal” at Connie’s Inn as a soft-shoe dance number. Waller’s 1934 recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. “When My Sugar Walks Down the Street (All the Little Birdies Go Tweet-Tweet-Tweet)” is another popular 1920s jazz standard. It was widely covered by many artists including Duke Ellington, Nat King Cole, and Ella Fitzgerald among others. “You’re the Cutest One” was written by Archie Berdahl and famously performed by Fats Waller in 1926. In this recording Bobby Short transitions from one tune to another with ease and grace, in his signature energetic, fast-paced style.

The Medley is part of the Album Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle. The renowned singer and pianist, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs an 18-song set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle. This timeless Album, Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, features Bobby Short, as well as Beverly Peer on Bass and Gene Gammage behind the drums.

 

Too Marvelous for Words

“Too Marvelous for Words” is a popular song written in 1937. It was lauded as a “model of pop songwriting, musically and lyrically” by the critics, who noted its surprising shifts in rhythm and key. The lyrics have won praise as sophisticated and perfectly synchronized with the tune.  “Too Marvelous for Words” was first introduced in the 1937 film Ready, Willing, and Able. The song was famously used in the 1947 film noir Dark Passage, starring Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart. “Too Marvelous for Words” became a pop and jazz standard, covered by artists like Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra. Bobby Short does a beautiful rendition of the song, polished and intimate at the same time.

“Too Marvelous for Words” is part of the Album Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle. The renowned singer and pianist, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs an 18-song set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle. This timeless Album, Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, features Bobby Short, as well as Beverly Peer on Bass and Gene Gammage behind the drums.

 

Why Shouldn’t I?

Cole Porter’s Jazz standard “Why Shouldn’t I?” was first recorded by Rosemary Clooney in 1956, and quickly became a hit. The song encourages listeners to overcome their hesitations and fears when it comes to love. It reminds us that taking risks and embracing vulnerability is essential for experiencing the depths of true love and the joy it brings. The melodic progression of “Why Shouldn’t I?” captures the emotions expressed in the lyrics, evoking a sense of longing, hope, and self-reflection. The warm and melancholic tones of the melody enhance the song’s overall message. Bobby Short gives a swinging and emotional performance of the familiar tune.

“Why Shouldn’t I?” is part of the Album Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle. The renowned singer and pianist, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs an 18-song set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle. This timeless Album, Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, features Bobby Short, as well as Beverly Peer on Bass and Gene Gammage behind the drums.

 

The Best Is Yet To Come

“The Best Is Yet To Come” was first introduced in the 1962 musical “The Roar of the Greasepaint – The Smell of the Crowd.” It comes at a point when the protagonist recognizes the importance of persevering through challenges and maintaining a positive outlook. The song’s optimistic and uplifting message has made it a popular choice for artists to cover and has been featured in numerous movies and TV shows. The best-known versions are by Tony Bennett and Frank Sinatra (The words The Best Is Yet To Come are even engraved on Sinatra’s tombstone.)  Bobby Short’s rendition of this beloved Jazz standard exudes charm and elegance, leaving a lasting impression on anyone who listens.

“The Best Is Yet To Come” is part of the Album Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle. The renowned singer and pianist, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs an 18-song set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle. This timeless Album, Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, features Bobby Short, as well as Beverly Peer on Bass and Gene Gammage behind the drums.

 

My Personal Property

“My Personal Property” is a famous collaboration by the legendary lyricist Dorothy Fields and composer Cy Coleman. The song was written for the musical “Sweet Charity”, starring Gwen Verdon. The musical was a smash hit and earned Fields and Coleman a Tony nomination.  The song is an ode to New York, mentioning the city’s famous landmarks and its everlasting charm. Bobby Short performs this love song to the big apple with gusto and high energy.

“My Personal Property” is part of the Album Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle. The renowned singer and pianist, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs an 18-song set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle. This timeless Album, Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, features Bobby Short, as well as Beverly Peer on Bass and Gene Gammage behind the drums.


How’s Your Romance?

“How’s Your Romance?” is a Cole Porter song “How’s Your Romance” written for the 1930s musical “Gay Divorcee”. The musical was later made into a film, starring Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire. Bobby Short was particularly fond of Cole Porter’s music. Porter’s wit is effectively brought out by Short’s smooth tenor, well-placed emphases, and precise pronunciation. Porter was the voice of wealth and sophistication in interwar show music, and Short’s interpretations rendered his sentiments with just the right combination of zest and humor.

“How’s Your Romance?” is part of the Album Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle. The renowned singer and pianist, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs an 18-song set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle. This timeless Album, Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, features Bobby Short, as well as Beverly Peer on Bass and Gene Gammage behind the drums.

 

When In Rome (I Do As the Romans Do)

“When in Rome (I Do as the Romans Do)” was released in 1964 and quickly became a hit. The song presents a simple and somewhat humorous message: when in Rome, do as the Romans do. However, the message behind the song is much deeper than it appears on the surface. The song is about adapting to different cultures while still maintaining one’s core values. The song’s meaning is straightforward, though it’s interesting to note that the song was released during the Civil Rights Movement. Many believed the song was a subtle nod to the movement’s message of equality and acceptance. Bobby Short delivers an energetic and joyful performance of the song in his signature velvety voice. The artist’s piano accompaniment demonstrates his exceptional skills.“When in Rome (I Do as the Romans Do)” is part of the Album Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle. The renowned singer and pianist, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs an 18-song set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle. This timeless Album, Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, features Bobby Short, as well as Beverly Peer on Bass and Gene Gammage behind the drums.


Say It Isn’t So

“Say It Isn’t So” is a popular song by Irving Berlin, published in 1932. The song was written when Berlin was suffering a loss of confidence following several setbacks and he initially placed the song in a drawer feeling that it would not be successful. However, one of Berlin’s employees – Max Winslow – heard it and on his own initiative took it to Rudy Vallée, who was then a major star on radio. Vallee sang it on his radio show and it became an immediate hit. George Olsen and His Orchestra released a version in 1932 that reached No. 1 and other popular versions in 1932 were by Ozzie Nelson and Connee Boswell. Alfredo Antonini and his orchestra collaborated with Victoria Cordova and John Serry Sr. to record the work for Muzak in the 1940s. Bobby Short beautifully sings “Say It Isn’t So”, with emotion and a touch of sadness in his voice.

“Say It Isn’t So” is part of the Album Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle. The renowned singer and pianist, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs an 18-song set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle. This timeless Album, Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, features Bobby Short, as well as Beverly Peer on Bass and Gene Gammage behind the drums.

 

Losing My Mind

“Losing My Mind” is a torch song written by Stephen Sondheim originally for the 1971 musical Follies for the character of a former showgirl, Sally Durant Plummer. The song became a popular top ten hit for singer and actress Liza Minnelli in 1989 on the UK Singles Chart and in Europe. “Losing My Mind” has been covered by many artists over the years. In this performance of the iconic tune, Bobby Short showcases his impeccable phrasing and innate ability to bring a song to life, captivating audiences with every note. He starts out singing slowly and soulfully, and proceeds to sing quicker and louder, returning to a quieter voice towards the end of the song.

“Losing My Mind” is part of the Album Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle. The renowned singer and pianist, with his legendary repertoire from the greats of Tin Pan Alley, performs an 18-song set with his usual verve and charm, live from the intimate and elegant setting of the Café Carlyle. This timeless Album, Bobby Short at the Café Carlyle, features Bobby Short, as well as Beverly Peer on Bass and Gene Gammage behind the drums.

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